Leadership

Meet Our Leadership Team

Damien Fair, PA-C, PhD

Positions

  • Redleaf Endowed Director, Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain
  • Professor, Institute of Child Development, College of Education and Human Development
  • Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Medical School

Summary of Current Research

My laboratory focuses on mechanisms and principles that underlie the developing brain. The majority of this work uses functional MRI and resting state functional connectivity MRI to assess typical and atypical populations. A second focus has become testing the feasibility of using various functional and structural MRI techniques in translational studies of developmental neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism). We are exploring ways to better characterize individual patients with these psychopathologies to help guide future diagnostic, therapeutic and genetic studies.


Eric Feczko, PhD

Positions

  • Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UMN

Summary of Current Research

As a young scientist, I aim to develop better tools for diagnosing and treating children with developmental disorders like autism. My aim requires extensive informatics and clinical training, I have studied developmental and aging disorders, functional and structural primate brain organization using MRI; I have also studied visual perception and social behavior using psychophysical tasks and observed behavior. Because of my research over the past decade, I am an expert in MRI, psychophysical, animal behavioral, and social network analysis techniques, and have studied autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Alzheimer’s disease, and the development of rhesus macaques.

From 2001-2007, I studied structural and functional MRI from Nouchine Hadjkahni, Gordon Harris, Christopher Wright, and Bradford Dickerson. In 2005, I received my B.A. in neuroscience from Brandeis University. From 2007-2013. I pursued and obtained my Ph.D. in neuroscience at Washington University in St. Louis, where I mastered network analysis, resting state functional MRI, and studied autism spectrum disorders. As a postdoc at Emory University from 2013-2016, I studied rhesus macaque visual and social development with Lisa Parr, Mar Sanchez, and Jocelyne Bachevalier. Since arriving at Oregon Health and Sciences University in 2016, I received a position on the National Library of Medicine postdoctoral fellowship, and pivoted towards data science and informatics. In my latest work, I developed an approach to characterize heterogeneity of clinical outcomes.


Nora Byington, BS

Positions

  • Lab Manager, DCAN Lab
  • Research Professional, Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain

Summary of Current Research

I’m a Research Professional and manager of the DCAN Lab. I support research goals of the lab across multiple grants and projects through independent and collaborative investigation. I also lead the data collection efforts for our UMN based projects. I joined the lab in June 2020 with 4 years of clinical research coordination and data collection experience. I plan to utilize behavioral and neuroimaging data to explore atypical neurodevelopment and neurodevelopmental risk factors across the lifespan. I plan to continue my research by pursuing a PhD in Clinical Psychology.


Anita Randolph, PhD

Positions

  • Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UMN

Summary of Current Research

I am a proud first-generation college graduate with a passion for research and service. I graduated in 2011 from the University of Georgia (UGA) with a triple major in Animal Science with an emphasis in Animal Biology (BSA), Microbiology (BS), and Genetics (BS). While at UGA, I conducted research in several fields including evolutionary genetics, avian mycoplasmosis, and the use of human stem cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. As a Preparatory Research Experience Postbaccalaureate Program (PREP) Scholar at the University of Alabama – Birmingham, I studied alterations in astrocytic protein and gene expression in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

In 2014, I began graduate studies at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston). My dissertation research focused on characterizing ovine central nervous damage after acute exposure to smoke inhalation with and without third-degree skin burn injury. After the completion of my dissertation in 2018, I was awarded the OHSU Fellowship for Diversity Inclusion in Research Award. Currently, I am researching addiction in collaboration with Dr. Damien Fair and Dr. William HoffmanI am also the co-director of our Youth Engaged in Science (YES!) outreach program. When I am not conducting research, I am engaged in several outreach projects throughout the greater Portland area and abroad in countries such as Ghana, Tanzania, and South Africa.


Alice Graham, PhD

Positions

  • Principal Investigator: Roo Study on Mom and Baby Well-Being
  • Assistant Professor, Psychiatry
  • Assistant Professor, Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Core Faculty, OHSU Clinical Psychology Program

*Alice Graham is leadership at OHSU

Summary of Current Research

I am a developmental neuroscientist and clinical psychologist. I received my PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Oregon. I completed my clinical internship and residency in the Child Development & Rehabilitation Center and the Department of Psychiatry at OHSU. I did a postdoctoral research fellowship in Behavioral Neuroscience at OHSU mentored by Damien Fair at OHSU and Claudia Buss at UC Irvine and Charité University of Medicine in Berlin.

In the fall of 2018, I became an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at OHSU. I lead the Infant Team in the Development Cognition and Neuroimaging Lab. We study the developing brain beginning soon after birth. We’re interested in how the early environment, starting in the prenatal period, influences developing brain systems and behavioral outcomes. We use structural and functional MRI to characterize the developing brain. We work on optimizing tools so that we can do a good job of assessing early brain development, and how it differs between individuals. We also conduct intervention research with the aim of ameliorating effects of exposure to early life stress and supporting healthy brain development. The overarching goal of our work is prevention of psychiatric disorders and improvement of cognitive and emotional health across the lifespan.


Oscar Miranda Dominguez, PhD

Positions

  • Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at UMN

Summary of Current Research

Dr. Miranda-Dominguez is interested in understanding how mental and neurological disorders affect brain circuitry and how this information can be used to obtain a deeper understanding of the disease and to design model-based approaches to therapeutics, including but not limited to adaptive interventions and non-invasive neuromodulation.


Amanda Rueter, PhD

Positions

  • Project Manager, DCAN Lab
  • Research Project Specialist, Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain

Summary of Current Research

I am passionate about organizing priorities, conducting rigorous research, using data ethically, sharing knowledge in an accessible way, and keeping creativity in the forefront when imagining new solutions to old problems. My doctoral work focused on investigating how functional connectivity (ICA) is associated with personality traits related to externalizing behavior (i.e. impulsivity, and its opposite trait, Conscientiousness) in large adult datasets. I have expertise in planning, running, and managing fMRI studies from the very first research question through analyses and publication. Having served as a preclinical study director for Medtronic, and also a full-time teaching professor at a local community college, I enjoy bringing junior scientists and subject matter experts together to fulfill research goals efficiently and effectively.