Graduate Researchers

Melody Altschuler, BA. Melody is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in her second year of the Developmental Psychopathology and Clinical Science doctoral program at the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Child Development. She works primarily with Dr. Sylia Wilson in the Family Cognitive Affective Neurodevelopment Lab and Dr. Jed Elison in the Elison Lab for Developmental Brain and Behavior Research. She is interested in studying the neural and developmental processes that contribute to individual differences in social cognition and emotion regulation in both typical and atypical populations. She is also interested in understanding why children with autism spectrum disorder and internalizing/externalizing psychopathology have such striking differences in their development. Prior to graduate school, Melody received her B.A. in psychology from Bates College, where she wrote her honors thesis with Dr. Susan Faja in the Labs of Cognitive Neuroscience at Boston Children’s Hospital. She then spent two years at the Yale Child Study Center as a Sara S. Sparrow Fellow in Clinical Neuroscience

Kayla Nelson, BS.  Kayla is a graduate student in the developmental psychopathology and clinical science program at the Institute of Child Development. She received her BS in Psychology from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities and was the Project Coordinator in Dr. Ann Masten’s Project Competence Research on Risk and Resilience Lab at the Institute of Child Development prior to beginning her graduate program. Kayla is interested in understanding the role of risk and protective factors in the etiology and maintenance of psychopathology, with a focus on how lifetime experiences and early parenting behaviors affect adolescent well-being.

Emily Padrutt, BS. Emily is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in the developmental psychopathology and clinical science program at the Institute of Child Development. She received a BA in Psychology and Spanish from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and worked as a research coordinator in Dr. Michèle Mazzocco’s Math and Numeracy Lab at the Institute of Child Development prior to beginning graduate school. She is interested in understanding pathways of risk in the intergenerational transmission of depression, with a focus on the development of self- and emotion-regulation in infancy and early childhood.